Weather Discussion #0416

1:00 PM CDT | June 20, 2018

Scattered showers and storms are occurring from the middle Texas Coast through Northeast Texas and the Ark-La-Tex. To the northwest, there is a weak frontal boundary pushing across Oklahoma and Northwest Texas. This will keep a low chance for rain going across North Texas this afternoon and early evening. A storm system to our north will deepen as it moves into the Central Plains and Middle Mississippi Valley Thursday-Friday. This will strengthen the northwesterly flow over our part of the country. We will see a couple more frontal boundaries push into the region with a continued chance for storms. The favored area for storms will be across northern sections of the state, from the Texas Panhandle through Northeast Texas.

The Storm Prediction Center has a Marginal Risk of Severe Weather for parts of the Texas Panhandle and Northeast Texas tomorrow. Isolated Severe Storms will be possible in both areas. Hail and Wind will be the main hazards with any Severe Storm that manages to develop. A similar situation will probably unfold late Friday. The forecast for Saturday is less certain but warrants some attention. The models show another disturbance moving out of the Rockies and into the Central Plains. At the surface, a dryline could set up across Northwest Texas with a cool front across the Texas Panhandle and Oklahoma. Temperatures south of the front and on both sides of the dryline will likely be near or above 100*F. With ample moisture, we will have to keep an eye on the dryline. If the disturbance tracks farther north, the potential for Strong Storms would decrease. It is something to watch as we get closer.

I will keep an eye on the weather over the next few days. Not everyone will see rain during this time, but the northwesterly flow aloft will keep at least a low chance in the forecast, particularly from the Texas Panhandle through Northeast Texas, through this weekend. Check back here and on the Facebook page for the latest updates. For local weather information, go to Weather.gov.